princeton

Rutgers Scarlet Knight Fall (9/23/17), Maryland Fall, and Princeton PHSAT Wrap-Ups (9/30/2017)

On two Saturdays in September, 9/23 and 9/30, seven Pennsylvania schools ventured outside of the borders of our fair state to open their quizbowl seasons. With some impressive showings all around, this year stands poised to be an extremely exciting one in Pennsylvania!

At Rutgers’ Scarlet Knight Fall tournament on 9/23, three teams from Friends Select and two from Delaware Valley began their 2017-18 campaigns. DV A finished the highest of the lot, ending up in the superplayoffs for 3rd place and claiming 5th overall. Colin Kawan-Hemler continued to lead the way with 45.65 points per game, but his teammates all added solid contributions, particlarly Frani King’s 35.22 PPG. They also won a game by the slightest of margins, 335-330, over Friends Select A. FSS A also demonstrated a balanced attack on the day, with 51.36 PPG from Richard Chen, 34.55 from Jake Shapiro, and 29.09 from Rudyard Lynch. Both teams notched key wins against top teams from the New Jersey region, as DV defeated Kellenberg A and Saint Joseph’s A, while FSS downed Princeton A. Both squads justified their preseason rankings nicely, and they look set for strong seasons ahead.

Friends Select B and C and Delaware Valley B also had good days as well, each finishing 4-7. FSS B demonstrated some balance of their own, as each of their players averaged at least a tossup per game. Jonah Taranta put in some impressive work as top scorer with 35.91 PPG. On DV B, Emma Dove led the way with 46.82 PPG, with strong support from Chris Secular. It’s certainly exciting to see programs continue to develop strong players for the future! Full stats for the Scarlet Knight Fall tournament can be found at this link.

Downingtown STEM and Lehigh Valley Academy each went 7-4 and finished 4th and 5th, respectively, against a challenging field on a housewritten set at Maryland Fall at the University of Maryland. STEM’s Vishwa Shanmugam compiled an especially impressive statline, scoring 103.18 points per game on the day, with 59 powers to 33 10s. The team as a whole added a major feather to its cap with a 430-290 win over Maryland power Montgomery Blair A, and they also scored a 435-275 victory over preseason #1 Lehigh Valley Academy. Alex Schmidt played solo on the day and put up nothing less than the spectacular numbers we’ve come to expect from him, going 60/67/8 for 139.09 PPG. Aside from one ten point victory against Thomas Jefferson C, though, his matches had high variance, as he either won big (including getting all 20 tossups against TJ D) or lost by a decent margin. Nonetheless, both teams should be proud of their excellent work at a difficult tournament! Stats for the day can be found here. You can also see an extremely cool breakdown of points by category for teams and players here.

Three more Pennsylvania schools, Downingtown EastHenderson, and “Western Lehigh”, played at Princeton on NAQT IS-168. Downingtown East and Henderson A played in the “competitive” division, while Henderson B and Western Lehigh were in the “standard” division. D-East had a relatively tough go of it, going 2-4 in the morning rounds and 4-6 on the day, but well-deserved plaudits must be given to GPQB contributor Jackie Wu for leading the competitive division in the prelim rounds with 69.17 PPG. Henderson A had a strong day, going 4-2 in the preliminaries and earning a place in the second afternoon bracket. They were led by last year’s GPQB JV Player of the Year, Vijay Anne, with 58.33 PPG in their impressive morning performance, with good support from teammates Aravind and Aidan. Henderson is a team clearly on the up-and-up, making for further excitement in southeastern PA tournaments to come.

In the standard division, Western Lehigh rode a strong performance from Sahil Inaganti (you can find our recent interview with him here) all the way to a third place finish. In many ways, Sahil and his team remind me of myself and my former Emmaus squad. He is clearly a strong generalist already, with further room to grow especially on points per bonus, and if his teammates can hone in on a couple of key categories, they can be a team nobody will want to face. Finally, Henderson B also acquitted themselves well on the day, going 3-3 in the morning rounds and topping their afternoon bracket. Three of their players, Will, Dhanush, and Abheya, all averaged over 20 PPG on the day, showing off their strong potential. Stats for both divisions at Princeton can be found at this link.

A brief note about posting tournament stats: Full stats from Princeton were not released until this afternoon (10/7), thus explaining the timing of this post. Posting stats a full week after the tournament is, quite frankly, not acceptable. When hosting a tournament, you should have a person whose dedicated job is to get stats completed and posted by Sunday evening at the latest. Taking some time to familiarize yourself with SQBS (here is a link to a good guide) can pay great dividends in getting stats published and available for interested teams, parents, and readers!

– Ryan

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PHSAT XXIV @ Princeton Brief Wrap-Up and Thoughts

Princeton University’s PHSAT XXIV took place last weekend on Sept. 24th with 36 teams (mostly from NJ) in attendance. Full stats are here.

The PA teams had a hard time generally, with Lehigh Valley A the only PA team to end with a winning record. As usual, Alex Schmidt put up a stellar individual performance with 120 PPG, but the combined power of High Tech A and defending national champions Hunter A kept LVA from making the top 4. It was good to see Alex with more teammates though including an LVA B team that played in the JV division. But despite the gaudy 24.48 PPB, it’s clear that LVA A will need some more people to step up to help Alex steal some TUs from the top teams.

The mysterious “Exton” HS finished in the middle of the bottom part of the varsity division with a solid 18.68 PPG (this is on an IS set). Henderson A finished at the bottom of a loaded varsity bracket and Henderson B finished in the middle of the pack in the JV bracket.

Wilmington Charter is back too, but considerably depleted after last year. Their A team put up a fight in all their games except for a nearly 500 point loss to Hunter A (it’s pretty devastating when the defending national champs retain most of their scoring) and their B team finished strong as well. It’s good to see them back on the circuit though after a lot of changes in their offseason.

One interesting development was the emergence of Princeton High School playing their first-ever all-subject quizbowl tournament. Princeton A made the top brackets with a balanced scoring attack and the rest of their teams were competitive in the JV division. Given that Princeton is just an hour and fifteen minutes by train from Philadelphia, I’d hope to see them at more Philly-area tournaments.

The tournament ran considerably slower and with more bumps that you might think for the 24th edition of a tournament. Most of the issues could have been addressed with a bit more planning in advance, so here are just a few pieces of advice for potential future tournament hosts:

  • If you have a complicated building space, make it easier to navigate for teams. Provide maps of the building with the game rooms marked. Get moderators to help lead teams to rooms. Put up little posters with directions to rooms. These may seem small, but they’re really helpful for teams and reduce the time it takes for teams to change rooms. They also help avoid situations where a team is standing outside the wrong room for 20 minutes.
  • If competent moderators from other schools come to help you, make use of them! Quizbowl depends on others volunteering their time to come help you (reimbursing for travel is the minimum that you need to do), so make outside moderators feel appreciated and thank them for coming out. This also means making it a good moderating experience by being clear about where to go and when instead of having people frantically rushing in and out of rooms trying to figure out where to go. Furthermore, if you do want to keep some people “in reserve,” you need to make sure to monitor other moderators and see if any are falling behind so that you can replace them with your reserve. Having a bunch of competent moderators do menial work or just sit around while less-than-competent moderators read is not a good situation.
  • Limit rebracketings and make sure they take place over natural breaks (like lunch) as much as possible. If you do have to rebracket, you need to be crystal-clear on your criteria for rebracketing and have that ready to go as soon as the stats are up.
  • If you’re planning on printing out new schedules for rebracketing, have a printer lined up and ready to go on-site with you. For years I’ve lugged my Brother printer to tournaments and it makes everything so much easier when you have it there rather than trying to rely on a far-away printer or possibly wonky wifi.
  • Google Sheets are a terrible idea for keeping score. They are slow to load on wifi connections, do not signal when a round is “done” for the scorekeepers, and in general are a pain to navigate and use. Use neg5 if you want to do scorekeeping electronically. I personally prefer paper scoresheets still.